Immigration Law Myths and Misconceptions

Different people may have different experiences when applying for a U.S. visa. Others have no first-hand experience at all and only rely on the stories they hear from those who either have experience in applying for a visa or those who know someone who does. Immigration law is not as confusing as many make it out to be, but only if you rely on real and reliable sources. Don’t believe everything you hear, as there are many myths about the immigration process out there.

There Are So Many Immigrants, They’re Taking All the Jobs

Immigrants account for about 13.5% of the total population of the United States, so it’s impossible for them to take over the country and dominate all the jobs. It’s actually more possible for immigrants to become entrepreneurs, so they’re actually creating jobs that help native-born citizens, other immigrants, and the U.S. economy.

To Get a Green Card, All You Need Is a Job

Permanent legal residency is obtainable in the U.S., but it is not an easy process that only involves getting a job. It takes years for the relatives of a U.S. citizen to become eligible for a green card. As this process can be difficult and long, it is a good idea to hire an immigration lawyer rather than simply believing your job can fast-track it.

You Can Ace a U.S. Citizenship Interview by Buying the Questions From Someone

No, you cannot possibly acquire the questions or the answers from anyone. Nobody knows what questions you will be asked ahead of time. However, you might be able to find some sample questions online just to give you a brief idea. These samples are not a guarantee.

You can jeopardize your visa application if you ask for help from those who have no actual knowledge of the process. It’s much more advisable to seek the assistance of an immigration attorney. Get in touch with The Costas Network Law Center at (216) 577-7612 – Ohio or (346) 333-0703 – Texas. You can also use this to contact us.

Share:

Recent Post

Green Card for Unmarried Adult Children

Your children’s age and marital status are critical factors in the immigration process. United States immigration law defines a “child” as an unmarried person under